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Real Estate Market Fundamentals Defined
A Balanced Market
In the ideal local real estate market, there should be a balance between demand for homes and the supply of homes available for sale. Although there is no exact benchmark to measure balance, there are ways of knowing if a local real estate market is close to being a balanced one.

A local market has an adequate supply of homes for sale if houses on the market sell within six months - even higher in coastal areas where 12 months is considered a balanced market.

A Seller’s Market
When the market demand for homes in a particular area is high and there is a shortage of homes available for sale, the balance of power in the market shifts toward the seller. With excess demand in the market for homes, sellers can wait for offers on their property to reach (or exceed) their minimum selling price.

We were in a seller’s market in early 2005 at the height of the real estate boom in most of our nation’s housing markets. Housing was “hot,” particularly in ocean resort towns. This prolonged excess demand for properties exerted substantial upward pressure on prices

A Buyer’s Market

When demand for new and existing homes is weak and there is a glut of properties available on the market, the uipper hand in negotiations switches to buyers.

Buyers now have a much wider choice of properties from which to choose and are often able to negotiate a price that is lower than the listed price.

Sellers do all they can to sell their homes—even offering to pay some of the upfront costs of the buyers, reducing the listing price, and offering other incentives to attract buyers.

Demand for Property
People purchase homes for a variety of reasons. Whether a second-home buyer or a real estate investor, there are a variety of reason why and where people purchase coastal property.

Put all these factors together and you have the local demand for property.Demand for real estate influences the willingness and ability of households to make home purchases.

All factors influencing demand can be grouped into four categories: population factors, home-buyer wherewithal factors, investment factors, and purchase-cost factors.


Some factors that will help you evaluate the magnitude of demand and supply:
  • Population and Job Growth
  • Months’ supply of Inventory
  • Investor Share of Market
  • Planned New Construction
  • Proximity to Waterfront
  • Desirable Climate
  • Local Economy
  • Hospital and medical services
  • Recreation and Parks
  • Culture and Ethnicity
  • Entertainment
  • Affordability
  • Safety
A Balanced Market
In the ideal local real estate market, there should be a balance between demand for homes and the supply of homes available for sale. Although there is no exact benchmark to measure balance, there are ways of knowing if a local real estate market is close to being a balanced one.

A local market has an adequate supply of homes for sale if houses on the market sell within six months - even higher in coastal areas where 12 months is considered a balanced market.

A Seller’s Market
When the market demand for homes in a particular area is high and there is a shortage of homes available for sale, the balance of power in the market shifts toward the seller. With excess demand in the market for homes, sellers can wait for offers on their property to reach (or exceed) their minimum selling price.

We were in a seller’s market in early 2005 at the height of the real estate boom in most of our nation’s housing markets. Housing was “hot,” particularly in ocean resort towns. This prolonged excess demand for properties exerted substantial upward pressure on prices

A Buyer’s Market

When demand for new and existing homes is weak and there is a glut of properties available on the market, the uipper hand in negotiations switches to buyers.

Buyers now have a much wider choice of properties from which to choose and are often able to negotiate a price that is lower than the listed price.

Sellers do all they can to sell their homes—even offering to pay some of the upfront costs of the buyers, reducing the listing price, and offering other incentives to attract buyers.

Demand for Property
People purchase homes for a variety of reasons. Whether a second-home buyer or a real estate investor, there are a variety of reason why and where people purchase coastal property.

Put all these factors together and you have the local demand for property.Demand for real estate influences the willingness and ability of households to make home purchases.

All factors influencing demand can be grouped into four categories: population factors, home-buyer wherewithal factors, investment factors, and purchase-cost factors.


Some factors that will help you evaluate the magnitude of demand and supply:
  • Population and Job Growth
  • Months’ supply of Inventory
  • Investor Share of Market
  • Planned New Construction
  • Proximity to Waterfront
  • Desirable Climate
  • Local Economy
  • Hospital and medical services
  • Recreation and Parks
  • Culture and Ethnicity
  • Entertainment
  • Affordability
  • Safety
Real Estate Cycles and Market Timing
Real Estate valuation tends to respond to regional & local influences. You have to know what’s going on in your market and with the type of property you’re investing in.

Today, forces other than supply and demand can influence the market. Property flipping, over development, population migration and baby boomer retirement. Inventory on the market, price spread and time on the market are a wise starting point in evaluating local conditions. Other factors to consider: Rental Market - study rental rates and demand. Financing - low rates inspire an increase in the rate of loans issued and financing terms. Supply and Demand - more demand pushes up prices, too much supply pushes them down.

Real demand has a lot to do with prices moving higher in an area. Real demand is the need and desire for housing on the part of buyers, who intend to occupy those homes. Real supply will consist of newly constructed properties that match the demand.

External influences on real estate can include: natural disasters, environmental problems, trends in population, capital investments and the related changes in demand for housing; employment; & quality of life issues.

Guidelines for analyzing a local market:
  • Study price trends for the past 5 yrs
  • Collect regional economic info
  • How much real estate is under construction
  • What are the employment & population trends
  • Look beyond price to review other important factors such as climate and crime

Timing Recommendations for Single-Family, Rental, and Second Homes


INFLATION
Moderate (1% to 10%) Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Buy, Sell, or Hold
Hyperinflation (>10%) Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Hold or Sell
Deflation (<0%) Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Sell

INTEREST RATES

Low to Moderate (5% to 10%) Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Buy, Sell, or Hold
High (>10%) Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Hold or Sell

FLOW OF FUNDS
Flow In: Recommendations for Single-Family Homes: Buy or Hold
Flow Out: Recommendations for Single-Family Homes: Sell or Hold

JOB GROWTH
Steady or Increasing: Recommendations for Single-Family Homes: Buy or Hold
Negative or Rapid Decline: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Sell

MIGRATION
Into the Area: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Buy or Hold
Out of the Area: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Sell

PATH OF PROGRESS
Path Moving Toward You: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Buy or Hold
Path Moving Away from You: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Sell

NEW CONSTRUCTION
Equal to or Less Than Demand: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Buy or Hold
Greater Than Demand: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Sell
Real Estate valuation tends to respond to regional & local influences. You have to know what’s going on in your market and with the type of property you’re investing in.

Today, forces other than supply and demand can influence the market. Property flipping, over development, population migration and baby boomer retirement. Inventory on the market, price spread and time on the market are a wise starting point in evaluating local conditions. Other factors to consider: Rental Market - study rental rates and demand. Financing - low rates inspire an increase in the rate of loans issued and financing terms. Supply and Demand - more demand pushes up prices, too much supply pushes them down.

Real demand has a lot to do with prices moving higher in an area. Real demand is the need and desire for housing on the part of buyers, who intend to occupy those homes. Real supply will consist of newly constructed properties that match the demand.

External influences on real estate can include: natural disasters, environmental problems, trends in population, capital investments and the related changes in demand for housing; employment; & quality of life issues.

Guidelines for analyzing a local market:
  • Study price trends for the past 5 yrs
  • Collect regional economic info
  • How much real estate is under construction
  • What are the employment & population trends
  • Look beyond price to review other important factors such as climate and crime

Timing Recommendations for Single-Family, Rental, and Second Homes


INFLATION
Moderate (1% to 10%) Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Buy, Sell, or Hold
Hyperinflation (>10%) Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Hold or Sell
Deflation (<0%) Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Sell

INTEREST RATES

Low to Moderate (5% to 10%) Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Buy, Sell, or Hold
High (>10%) Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Hold or Sell

FLOW OF FUNDS
Flow In: Recommendations for Single-Family Homes: Buy or Hold
Flow Out: Recommendations for Single-Family Homes: Sell or Hold

JOB GROWTH
Steady or Increasing: Recommendations for Single-Family Homes: Buy or Hold
Negative or Rapid Decline: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Sell

MIGRATION
Into the Area: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Buy or Hold
Out of the Area: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Sell

PATH OF PROGRESS
Path Moving Toward You: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Buy or Hold
Path Moving Away from You: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Sell

NEW CONSTRUCTION
Equal to or Less Than Demand: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Buy or Hold
Greater Than Demand: Recommendation for Single-Family Homes: Sell
Baby Boomer Influence
The baby boom generation is defined as those people born between the years 1946 and 1964 - about 78 million!

The most interesting and relevant fact about boomers is that they tend to do things together in a big way. When the boomer generation decided that golf was not just for older gentlemen wearing plaid pants and green blazers, golf became big business.

Everything boomers do as a group has a significant impact on the economy, the financial markets, and, of course, the real estate markets. Yes, there are plenty of other population groups aside from boomers – retirees, the baby bust, immigrants, and echo boomers. Focusing on the life-cycle trends for all of these population groups will help you better understand trends in real estate values. But baby boomers are the largest single generational group in history, and they possess the greatest wealth.

Boomers will soon become empty-nesters and/or be retiring. As a consequence, cash-rich boomers are purchasing more second homes. Empty-nester boomers – those whose children have left home – are downsizing and buying smaller homes, including condominiums. Retiree boomers are moving to retirement locations. It is no coincidence that over the past ten years, property values climbed substantially in resort and retirement locations.

Vacation-Property Boomers
Boomers have the greatest appetite for purchasing vacation/resort properties. Almost 13 percent of all home purchases in 2005 were vacation-home purchases, and boomers were a major force behind that second-home-buying activity. Cash-rich boomers are expected to continue to purchase high-end properties in popular resort destinations. Moderate-income boomers are expected to avoid overpriced and expensive resort locations and purchase modest vacation properties in locations closer to their primary residences.

Retiree Boomers
With every year there is an increasing percentage of boomers close to retirement age. The first boomers will reach the official retirement age of sixty-five in 2011. However, there are a number of boomers between the ages of fifty-five and sixty who have already taken early retirement. They are already exerting upward pressure on retirement-home values. Look for retiring boomers to dominate the home-buying marketplace during the next ten to fifteen years.

Some Baby Boomer facts:
  • In 2011, the first wave of America’s 78 million boomers will turn sixty-five.
  • Boomers are far more ethnically diverse than are prior generations.
  • Less than 75 percent of boomers are white, while nearly 90 percent of Americans born before 1946 are white.
  • Boomers are more highly educated than are their predecessor generations: 27 percent of boomers have college degrees, compared with 12 percent of today’s older Americans. More than 60 percent of boomers have high school diplomas, compared with only 44 percent of older groups.
  • Boomers are more interested in consumer information, sports, and technology than are preceding generations.
  • Boomers, as a group, view their old age or retirement years as a time of lifestyle transition rather than as a termination of employment.
  • Many boomers intend to keep working after retirement but not in their primary occupations. Eight of ten boomers said they will continue to work during their retirement years.
Saying boomers have a strong connection to real estate greatly understates the facts. Virtually all boomers agree that owning a home is a good financial investment, almost 4 in 5 boomer households are homeowners and 1 in 4 boomers owns other real estate as well. NAR surveys have found that they are at least 50% of all owners of vacation homes or other investment properties.

Retirement plans clearly on their minds. Some indicate they bought a vacation home with the expectation that it will become their retirement home in the future or will be looking for one. Nearly 60% of vacation owners and investment owners are between 45 and 64 years old. 57% of homeowners age 55-64 will purchase a second home within 5 years. 10 million baby boomers will have second homes by 2010.
The baby boom generation is defined as those people born between the years 1946 and 1964 - about 78 million!

The most interesting and relevant fact about boomers is that they tend to do things together in a big way. When the boomer generation decided that golf was not just for older gentlemen wearing plaid pants and green blazers, golf became big business.

Everything boomers do as a group has a significant impact on the economy, the financial markets, and, of course, the real estate markets. Yes, there are plenty of other population groups aside from boomers – retirees, the baby bust, immigrants, and echo boomers. Focusing on the life-cycle trends for all of these population groups will help you better understand trends in real estate values. But baby boomers are the largest single generational group in history, and they possess the greatest wealth.

Boomers will soon become empty-nesters and/or be retiring. As a consequence, cash-rich boomers are purchasing more second homes. Empty-nester boomers – those whose children have left home – are downsizing and buying smaller homes, including condominiums. Retiree boomers are moving to retirement locations. It is no coincidence that over the past ten years, property values climbed substantially in resort and retirement locations.

Vacation-Property Boomers
Boomers have the greatest appetite for purchasing vacation/resort properties. Almost 13 percent of all home purchases in 2005 were vacation-home purchases, and boomers were a major force behind that second-home-buying activity. Cash-rich boomers are expected to continue to purchase high-end properties in popular resort destinations. Moderate-income boomers are expected to avoid overpriced and expensive resort locations and purchase modest vacation properties in locations closer to their primary residences.

Retiree Boomers
With every year there is an increasing percentage of boomers close to retirement age. The first boomers will reach the official retirement age of sixty-five in 2011. However, there are a number of boomers between the ages of fifty-five and sixty who have already taken early retirement. They are already exerting upward pressure on retirement-home values. Look for retiring boomers to dominate the home-buying marketplace during the next ten to fifteen years.

Some Baby Boomer facts:
  • In 2011, the first wave of America’s 78 million boomers will turn sixty-five.
  • Boomers are far more ethnically diverse than are prior generations.
  • Less than 75 percent of boomers are white, while nearly 90 percent of Americans born before 1946 are white.
  • Boomers are more highly educated than are their predecessor generations: 27 percent of boomers have college degrees, compared with 12 percent of today’s older Americans. More than 60 percent of boomers have high school diplomas, compared with only 44 percent of older groups.
  • Boomers are more interested in consumer information, sports, and technology than are preceding generations.
  • Boomers, as a group, view their old age or retirement years as a time of lifestyle transition rather than as a termination of employment.
  • Many boomers intend to keep working after retirement but not in their primary occupations. Eight of ten boomers said they will continue to work during their retirement years.
Saying boomers have a strong connection to real estate greatly understates the facts. Virtually all boomers agree that owning a home is a good financial investment, almost 4 in 5 boomer households are homeowners and 1 in 4 boomers owns other real estate as well. NAR surveys have found that they are at least 50% of all owners of vacation homes or other investment properties.

Retirement plans clearly on their minds. Some indicate they bought a vacation home with the expectation that it will become their retirement home in the future or will be looking for one. Nearly 60% of vacation owners and investment owners are between 45 and 64 years old. 57% of homeowners age 55-64 will purchase a second home within 5 years. 10 million baby boomers will have second homes by 2010.
Local Sales Offices
Texas Gulf Coast Fundamentals
Texas housing markets are among the most undervalued in the nation - according to a new analysis of data by Global Insight Inc. and National City Corp. In Texas, recent rapid increases in home prices never occurred, so the state has avoided the real estate bubble that has plagued other coastal areas.

Home prices in Texas have defied the overall downward trend seen in other U.S. housing markets - according to a study by First American LoanPerformance. LoanPerformance Home Price Index reports 12-month home price changes by the top 30 core-based statistical areas. The LoanPerformance HPI incorporates more than 30 years of repeat sales transactions, representing more than 45 million observations, sourced from the property information database owned by its parent company, First American CoreLogic Inc.

The Federal Housing Oversight Office Reports Texas Housing Appreciation is the strongest in the nation: A new statistical study on real estate cycles suggests that smart investors should consider markets that were bypassed by the housing price boom of 2000-2005, and that have affordable home costs but are experiencing solid employment growth. The study was conducted by Dr. Christopher Cagan, research and analytics director for First American Real Estate Solutions.

Cagan focuses on Texas areas including: Austin, Beaumont, Corpus Christi, Dallas, Houston and San Antonio as "linear" markets that may well be poised for growth in real estate values.
Texas is benefiting economically from high energy costs, and with its moderate house prices and generally attractive business climate, could well attract investors who see their opportunities restricted in some of the high-cost, highly-cyclical East and West coast markets. These markets directly effect the Texas Coastal markets as they represent the main source of buyers for Texas resort properties.

"We didn't have the big blow up, the bubble," said Jim Gaines, research economist with the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University. While many states saw declines in 2007, housing prices in Texas surged almost 7 percent in the second quarter, according to federal statistics. This trend has continued through 2009.

Based on the market fundamentals and expert analysis - the Texas Gulf Coast market is poised to be one of the best performing real estate markets in the country for the foreseeable future!

Texas is one of the nation’s fastest growing states and strongest economies and has been named as the number one state in economic development by Business Facilities magazine.

With Texas' economic strength and population growth - and the growing interest from out-of-state and international buyers - the future for real estate on the coast never looked better.
Texas housing markets are among the most undervalued in the nation - according to a new analysis of data by Global Insight Inc. and National City Corp. In Texas, recent rapid increases in home prices never occurred, so the state has avoided the real estate bubble that has plagued other coastal areas.

Home prices in Texas have defied the overall downward trend seen in other U.S. housing markets - according to a study by First American LoanPerformance. LoanPerformance Home Price Index reports 12-month home price changes by the top 30 core-based statistical areas. The LoanPerformance HPI incorporates more than 30 years of repeat sales transactions, representing more than 45 million observations, sourced from the property information database owned by its parent company, First American CoreLogic Inc.

The Federal Housing Oversight Office Reports Texas Housing Appreciation is the strongest in the nation: A new statistical study on real estate cycles suggests that smart investors should consider markets that were bypassed by the housing price boom of 2000-2005, and that have affordable home costs but are experiencing solid employment growth. The study was conducted by Dr. Christopher Cagan, research and analytics director for First American Real Estate Solutions.

Cagan focuses on Texas areas including: Austin, Beaumont, Corpus Christi, Dallas, Houston and San Antonio as "linear" markets that may well be poised for growth in real estate values.
Texas is benefiting economically from high energy costs, and with its moderate house prices and generally attractive business climate, could well attract investors who see their opportunities restricted in some of the high-cost, highly-cyclical East and West coast markets. These markets directly effect the Texas Coastal markets as they represent the main source of buyers for Texas resort properties.

"We didn't have the big blow up, the bubble," said Jim Gaines, research economist with the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University. While many states saw declines in 2007, housing prices in Texas surged almost 7 percent in the second quarter, according to federal statistics. This trend has continued through 2009.

Based on the market fundamentals and expert analysis - the Texas Gulf Coast market is poised to be one of the best performing real estate markets in the country for the foreseeable future!

Texas is one of the nation’s fastest growing states and strongest economies and has been named as the number one state in economic development by Business Facilities magazine.

With Texas' economic strength and population growth - and the growing interest from out-of-state and international buyers - the future for real estate on the coast never looked better.
Bolivar Penisula Crystal Beach
  • Short Term: Hurricane Ike Massive Damage
  • Long Term: Future Market from large capital investments in the Beaumont Port Arthur primary buyer/rental market - and the state's promise to rebuild the area and make it an example of modern urban renewal.
  • Recommendation: Buy land now cheap in the proven safe areas for a long term investement. These areas include the high above sea-level and beach growing sections on the southern end of the peninsula. Starting just south of Crystal Beach.
  • Short Term: Hurricane Ike Massive Damage
  • Long Term: Future Market from large capital investments in the Beaumont Port Arthur primary buyer/rental market - and the state's promise to rebuild the area and make it an example of modern urban renewal.
  • Recommendation: Buy land now cheap in the proven safe areas for a long term investement. These areas include the high above sea-level and beach growing sections on the southern end of the peninsula. Starting just south of Crystal Beach.
Galveston Island
  • Short Term: Buyer's Market - Massive Hurricane Ike Damage to areas not behind the massive seawall
  • Long Term: Balanced Market from population growth and large local retirement population
  • Recommendation: Buy behind the seawall and look for modern huricane resistant structures and in the areas that survived hurricane Ike with liitle damage. Emerald By The Sea, The Dawn and Diamond Beach are good examples.
  • Short Term: Buyer's Market - Massive Hurricane Ike Damage to areas not behind the massive seawall
  • Long Term: Balanced Market from population growth and large local retirement population
  • Recommendation: Buy behind the seawall and look for modern huricane resistant structures and in the areas that survived hurricane Ike with liitle damage. Emerald By The Sea, The Dawn and Diamond Beach are good examples.
Corpus Christi Port Aransas
  • Short Term: Buyer's Market
  • Long Term: Balanced Market from population growth and large local retirement population. Several new products are improving the area's appeal.
  • Recommendation: Buy and look for motivated sellers or buy into the new area's re-defining products, examples include: Cinnamon Shore, Island Park Estates, Island Moorings area and Village Walk.
  • Short Term: Buyer's Market
  • Long Term: Balanced Market from population growth and large local retirement population. Several new products are improving the area's appeal.
  • Recommendation: Buy and look for motivated sellers or buy into the new area's re-defining products, examples include: Cinnamon Shore, Island Park Estates, Island Moorings area and Village Walk.
South Padre Island
  • Short Term: Buyer's Market
  • Long Term: Seller's Market when national housing market recovers, South Padre has Texas' only year round tropical climate, blue ocean water and white sands. The new super highway will improve access to the area.
  • Recommendation: Invest in the new hurricane resistant highrises on the oceanfront. Rental Demand is always strong and these are the popular product on South Padre with a limited supply. Also look for new marina bayside home products with protected boat facilities. The Radisson, The Sapphire and the Marina Vista Villas at the Shore are good examples.
  • Short Term: Buyer's Market
  • Long Term: Seller's Market when national housing market recovers, South Padre has Texas' only year round tropical climate, blue ocean water and white sands. The new super highway will improve access to the area.
  • Recommendation: Invest in the new hurricane resistant highrises on the oceanfront. Rental Demand is always strong and these are the popular product on South Padre with a limited supply. Also look for new marina bayside home products with protected boat facilities. The Radisson, The Sapphire and the Marina Vista Villas at the Shore are good examples.
Credits
Information contained in the advice is taken from the following real estate experts and authors:

David Lereah - former chief economist for the National Association of Realtors. Lereah served as the association's spokesman on economic forecasts, interest rates, home sales, mortgage rates, as well as other policy issues and trends affecting the United States real estate industry.

Craig Hall, Chairman Hall Financial Group - Hall is a past-recipient of the Ten Outstanding Young Men of America award, the Outstanding Business Leader award from Northwood University and the U.S.C. Jayson Ammons Free Enterprise award. He was also honored with the Ernst & Young Real Estate Entrepreneur of the Year award.

Michael C. Thomsett
- professional writer since 1978. Previously an accountant, from 1978 to 1984 he was a consultant in the financial services industry.

Joshua Kahr - a leading consultant, author, and professor on real estate finance and market analysis issues. He is a member of the faculty at Columbia Business School and an expert in the areas of real estate market analysis, development, and finance with extensive experience buying and selling properties.

Tom Kelly
- a professional journalist for 33 years. He served The Seattle Times as Real Estate Editor. Tom's weekly real estate column is syndicated nationally. He focuses on residential mortgage and tax options for Baby Boomers and Retirees.

John Tuccillo
- an economics and business consultant serving the real estate, financing, and technology sectors providing forecasting, analysis, planning, strategy and facilitation.

Douglas Hunter - writer for business and outdoor pursuits for publications ranging from Cottage Life magazine to The Globe and Mail. He is the author of thirteen books including how to find and finance the dream waterfront retreat.

John Burns - founder of John Burns Real Estate Consulting. He was a Senior Manager in the Real Estate Consulting group at KPMG Peat Marwick, and has been quoted as an expert by CNN, ABC World News Tonight, The Wall Street Journal, The Associated Press, USA Today, Bloomberg, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, Builder magazine, and others.

Michael Stuart - provides executive management for TexasGulfCoastOnline and is a Texas licensed agent. He has served as a designer of enterprise technologies and as a corporate executive. He was founder, CEO, and Chairman of AssetWorks Inc., now a division of a fortune 500 company for facilities management.
Information contained in the advice is taken from the following real estate experts and authors:

David Lereah - former chief economist for the National Association of Realtors. Lereah served as the association's spokesman on economic forecasts, interest rates, home sales, mortgage rates, as well as other policy issues and trends affecting the United States real estate industry.

Craig Hall, Chairman Hall Financial Group - Hall is a past-recipient of the Ten Outstanding Young Men of America award, the Outstanding Business Leader award from Northwood University and the U.S.C. Jayson Ammons Free Enterprise award. He was also honored with the Ernst & Young Real Estate Entrepreneur of the Year award.

Michael C. Thomsett
- professional writer since 1978. Previously an accountant, from 1978 to 1984 he was a consultant in the financial services industry.

Joshua Kahr - a leading consultant, author, and professor on real estate finance and market analysis issues. He is a member of the faculty at Columbia Business School and an expert in the areas of real estate market analysis, development, and finance with extensive experience buying and selling properties.

Tom Kelly
- a professional journalist for 33 years. He served The Seattle Times as Real Estate Editor. Tom's weekly real estate column is syndicated nationally. He focuses on residential mortgage and tax options for Baby Boomers and Retirees.

John Tuccillo
- an economics and business consultant serving the real estate, financing, and technology sectors providing forecasting, analysis, planning, strategy and facilitation.

Douglas Hunter - writer for business and outdoor pursuits for publications ranging from Cottage Life magazine to The Globe and Mail. He is the author of thirteen books including how to find and finance the dream waterfront retreat.

John Burns - founder of John Burns Real Estate Consulting. He was a Senior Manager in the Real Estate Consulting group at KPMG Peat Marwick, and has been quoted as an expert by CNN, ABC World News Tonight, The Wall Street Journal, The Associated Press, USA Today, Bloomberg, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, Builder magazine, and others.

Michael Stuart - provides executive management for TexasGulfCoastOnline and is a Texas licensed agent. He has served as a designer of enterprise technologies and as a corporate executive. He was founder, CEO, and Chairman of AssetWorks Inc., now a division of a fortune 500 company for facilities management.
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